Molly Yeh’s Guacamole Salad Recipe

With all the glorious warm weather in recent weeks, we’re seriously craving more light, healthy summer recipes that will curb our hunger pangs without leaving us feeling overheated. So, if you’re looking for something quick and easy – and that doesn’t require an oven – try this unique guacamole-inspired salad straight from Molly Yeh‘s kitchen.

Diced avocados, cucumber, red onion and roughly chopped garlic are drizzled with a homemade dressing that boasts the complementary flavours of paprika, oregano and lime. It’s definitely one of our new favourite ways to eat avocados.

Molly Yeh’s Guacamole Salad Recipe

Total Time: 10 minutes
Servings: 4-6

Ingredients:

3 avocados, diced
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 English cucumber, seeded and finely diced
1/2 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped
1/2 medium red onion, finely diced
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 lime, juiced
Hot sauce, as desired
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper


Directions:

1. In a medium bowl, combine the avocado, garlic, cucumber, cilantro and red onion.

2. In a separate small bowl, stir together the olive oil, paprika, oregano, lime juice and some hot sauce, salt and pepper.

3. Drizzle the dressing on top of the vegetables and fold to combine. Taste and adjust the seasoning.

A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables or fruit. However, different varieties of salad may contain virtually any type. Guacamole is an avocado-based dip, spread, or salad first developed in Mexico. In addition to its use in modern Mexican cuisine, it has become part of international and American cuisine as a dip, condiment and salad ingredient. Dip into Alton Brown’s kicked-up Guacamole recipe, loaded with jalapenos, tomatoes and cilantro, from Good Eats If you are running low in ingredients, guacamole is amazing when you only use avocados, a pinch of salt

A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables or fruit. However, different varieties of salad may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which can be served warm.

Garden salads use a base of leafy greens such as lettuce, arugula/rocket, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, Greek salad (vegetable-based, but without leafy greens), and sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad). The sauce used to flavor a salad is commonly called a salad dressing; most salad dressings are based on either a mixture of oil and vinegar or a fermented milk product like kefir.

Salads may be served at any point during a meal:

Appetizer salads—light, smaller-portion salads served as the first course of the meal.

Side salads—to accompany the main course as a side dish, examples include potato salad and Caesar salad.

Main course salads—usually containing a portion of a high-protein foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, legumes, or cheese.

Dessert salads—sweet versions containing fruit, gelatin, sweeteners or whipped cream.

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